Evaluating the Safety of Electroconvulsive Shock and Duloxetine Combination Therapy on Behavioral, Cardiovascular, and Brain Oxidative Stress Markers in the Mice

  • Bahareh Eghbal 1. Student Research Committee, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran 2. Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4826-2846
  • Ava Soltani Hekmat 2. Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
  • Seyed Amin Kouhpayeh 3. Departmentof Pharmacology, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
  • Ali Ghanbariasad 4. Noncommunicable Diseases Research Center, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran 5. Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
  • Kazem Javanmardi 2. Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
  • Nastaran Samimi 1. Student Research Committee, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran 4. Noncommunicable Diseases Research Center, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
  • Bahareh Fakhraei 6. Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
  • Mojtaba Farjam 4. Noncommunicable Diseases Research Center, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran
Keywords: Electroconvulsive Therapy, Duloxetine, Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Oxidative Stress

Abstract

Background: Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) as a well-established and effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders is an excellent option to treat the major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this experimental study was to determine the possible sides effects of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) and duloxetine, a serotonin-norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs), and evaluate the safety of this therapeutic approach on behavioral factors, cardiovascular function, and brain oxidative stress markers on mice. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into different groups receiving either ECS or different doses (10, 20, 40, 80, or 120 mg) of duloxetine alone or together. We evaluated the behavioral factors associated with administration of ECS with or without duloxetine. In addition, we monitored the ECGs (electrocardiogram) of animals prior to and after the experiment and also evaluated the oxidative stress markers including TAC, MDA, and GSH mice’s brains. Results: We did not detect any significant differences in terms of heart rate, RR interval, PR interval, QT, or corrected QT (QTc) between groups that received different doses of duloxetine in combination with ECS compare to the control group. Our findings suggest that while administration of ECS solely increased the oxidative stress markers and decreased the antioxidant capacity of the brain, a combination of duloxetine and ECS at certain doses alleviates the oxidative stress condition and increases the antioxidant capacity of the brain. Conclusion: Overall, this study suggests that the combination of ECS and duloxetine is safe and considerable for further studies on human subjects.

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Published
2021-12-31
How to Cite
Eghbal, B., Soltani Hekmat, A., Kouhpayeh, S. A., Ghanbariasad, A., Javanmardi, K., Samimi, N., Fakhraei, B., & Farjam, M. (2021). Evaluating the Safety of Electroconvulsive Shock and Duloxetine Combination Therapy on Behavioral, Cardiovascular, and Brain Oxidative Stress Markers in the Mice. Galen Medical Journal, 10, e2218. https://doi.org/10.31661/gmj.v10i0.2218
Section
Original Article